Sauce, Spread And Dips

Buticha Ethiopian Garbanzo Bean Spread



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Buticha is a chickpea or fava bean spread or dip made in Ethiopia. It is similar in many ways to the the Middle Eastern hummus that many vegetarians and foodies alike are familiar with, just a little thinner. Unlike it’s Middle Eastern counterparts, buticha is traditionally made with chickpea (garbanzo) or fava bean flour instead of with canned or rehydrated beans. The recipes below will cover how to make it traditionally, and quickly, with a can of beans from your pantry.

Quick Pantry Buticha

1 12 ounce can of chickpeas, drained
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 cup water
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 small red onion, minced
1/2 teaspoon prepared mustard
2 tablespoons prepared lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste

Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor or blender. Pulse until a smooth paste is formed.

Transfer to a container, and cover. Chill for at least 1 hour before serving.

Traditional Buticha

3 1/4 cups water
3/4 cups chickpea or fava bean flour
1 small red onion, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground yellow mustard
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 jalepeno, seeded and minced
salt and pepper to taste

In a medium -sized sauce pan, bring water to boil over high heat. Using a whisk combine the bean flour and water in the pan. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, constantly stirring. There will be lumps. Reduce heat to medium heat and cook another 3 minutes, continuing to stir constantly. Set mixture aside and allow to cool.

In a blender or food processor mix together the remaining ingredients. Add the chickpea flour mixture, and blend until smooth and thoroughly combined. Transfer to a container, and cover.

Allow to sit about an hour before serving to allow the flavors to properly meld. Serve at room temperature.

Buticha can be used as a substitute for mayonaise, as a dip for fresh vegetables, or as a side along with a traditional Ethiopian dinner, and dip injera in it. Buticha is usually served along side other cold salads, such as timita salata, azifa, and key sir.

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