Ethnic And International Foods

Blechkuchen



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I am always drawn to any German recipe containing the word Kuchen, because I know this means some kind of wonderful cake. Blechkuchen is usually a basic sheet cake topped with any in-season fruit. How can it not be just delicious?

Translation of the German word Blechkuchen: Blech meaning sheet and Kuchen meaning cake.

Blechkuchen is in fact, very similar to many coffeecakes. These being baked to share with favored family and friends, over mugs of steaming coffee; in the comfort of our kitchens.

In the following recipe I used currents, apples and brown sugar to make a thick sweet sauce. It turned out very well, so I am sharing this recipe with all of you.

This version of a German sheet cake is baked up-side-down style, flipped over to let the sweetness dribble down over the whole thing! It can be eaten right out of the oven however I usually let it cool for 5 minutes, then drizzle a powdered sugar glaze over-top.

-Blechkuchen with Apples & Currants

2 large granny smith apples, peeled and sliced thin
1 cup red currants
1/2 cup butter
1 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 cup whipping cream

Cake:

2 tsp. dry active yeast
3 tbsp. warm water
3 cups Bisquick baking mix
3/4 cups sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
1 cup cinnamon apple yogurt

Heat oven to 350oF.

Place butter, brown sugar and cream together in a sauce pan over medium heat just until butter is melted, stir to combine. Pour into bottom of a 13x9 inch cake pan, arrange apples over top, sprinkle currents evenly over apples.

For cake:

Dissolve yeast in 3 tbsp. water in a small measuring cup, reserve.

Stir Bisquick, sugar, vanilla, eggs and yogurt in a large bowl, add yeast mixture and beat with electric mixer 2 minutes. Let this batter sit for 5 minutes to activate yeast.

Carefully pour batter over apple, currant and brown sugar mixture in cake pan.

Bake 40-45 minutes or until tester inserted into center of cake comes out clean.

Remove from oven and cool 8 minutes. Place large platter upside down over cake; carefully turn cake and platter over. Let juices drizzle over cake for 1-2 minutes, remove pan. Drizzle with glaze at this point, if desired.

This is a delightful, unique cake and does qualify for the traditional Blechkuchen in every way.

Serve this updated version of Blechkuchen, with Apples & Currants anytime you need a jazzy coffeecake for family and friends!

 

More about this author: Sheila Watson Kraklow

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